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Monthly Archives: August 2017

Genetic Disposition For Obesity

The lifestyle of our ancestors has its marks on our epigenome, for the record of the chemical changes to our DNA, and what they ate, drank, smoked, whether they exercised or not, their stress and happiness levels, their temperaments and attitudes, all of these have affected our DNA. But the genetics alone is insufficient in explaining our health and disease status. The wellbeing of humans is the combined net effect of genetics and environmental factors. The lifestyle and environment introduces a kind of second code on top of the DNA, which can turn genes on or off. We are not slaves of our DNA, it is not our destiny; we can empower our DNA through positive changes in our lifestyle.

As the reality TV show “The Biggest Loser” has shown us, even the morbidly obese can lose weight when they follow a healthy eating plan and participate in moderately intense exercise on a regular basis. It’s not their genes that made them overweight in the first place but their bad lifestyle choices.

Research into identical twins has also revealed how siblings who share the exact same DNA can have totally different health outcomes when they live separate lives and choose different lifestyles. It’s what they do to their genes to express them (i.e. epigenetic modifications) that matters, not what their genes are made up of at birth. If the DNA sequence were all that mattered, identical twins would always be absolutely identical in every way.

Early in life, identical twins can be indistinguishable in the manner in which their genes are expressed. Among older sets of twins, however, significant differences in the gene-expression portraits are apparent. In addition, twins who spend the most time apart tend to have more divergent medical histories. Environmental factors, including smoking habits, physical activity levels and diet, can influence epigenetic patterns and may help explain how the same genotype can be translated in different ways.

Fibre Protect Your Heart

Experts say that it’s best to aim for a balanced diet rich with plenty of fibre-laden foods. According to them, it is the whole pattern that seems to have an effect so it is hard to pick out exact foods as food is a complex thing.
Heart-Health Perks

Fibre is mostly associated with a healthy digestive system, but research has shown that it can do a lot more than just keep you regular. Scientists are still trying to figure out how exactly fibre works in the body. Some ways by which it helps your heart are given below:

Lowers cholesterol: Soluble fibre reduces both bad (LDL) and overall cholesterol by binding with cholesterol particles in the digestive system and by driving them out of the body before they are absorbed.

Protects against strokes and diabetes: Stroke and diabetes lead to an increased risk of heart diseases. Fibre-rich whole grains lower the risk of a stroke by up to 36% and the risk of type 2 diabetes by up to 30%, as per research.

Reduces blood pressure: In another study, researchers put some people on a high-fibre diet that included lots of whole wheat and whole oats. After 12 weeks they found that the participants had a drop in blood and pulse pressure.

Encourages a healthy weight: Fibre can also become a weight loss weapon as it keeps you full by staving off hunger for a long time.

Longevity: All these benefits add up not only to better heart health but also to a longer life. In a study, researchers had observed a group of people for 9 years. They came to this conclusion that eating lots of fibre lowered the risk of early death among men and women.

So Difficult to Stop Smoking

Shortly after you finish smoking a cigarette, your body begins to show signals of withdrawal. You begin to crave another cigarette to overwhelm these symptoms, beginning a vicious cycle of dependence. Most smokers experience the first signs of withdrawal within hours of their last cigarette

It might seem difficult to find new approaches to handle your stress. Do you catch a smoke when you’re feeling stressed or nervous? Strain, whether it’s from your work, relationships, caregiving burdens or simply plain fast paced living, can cause you to look for fast and easy alleviation. But in the long term, smoking will only enhance your stress. To successfully stop smoking, you might need to re think your stress management choices before you stop.

Consider these tips:

Stop and take a deep breath. Taking five to 10 deep breaths is a great beginning to pressure alleviation. In addition, you get the advantage of inhaling clean air into your lungs without those dangerous compounds!

Go for a walk. Physical activity can release a substance in your body that improves your mood and relieves tension. Walking for thirty minutes a day can be a healthy distraction, burn off extra calories and help your heart.

Try to relax. Pressure can make your muscles stressed. Relax them by stretching, deep breathing, doing yoga, obtaining a message or even closing your eyes and visualizing yourself in a peaceful area.

Call a buddy. Talking through your highs and lows with family, friends or maybe a support group may give you comfort and positive reinforcement.

Cut back on caffeine. Caffeine is a stimulant that may raise your heart rate along with your tension. When you’re attempting to manage your stress, caffeine can make you tense, keep you up at night and may even cause you to want to smoke.

Take care of your own body. Drink lots of water, eat healthy and get enough sleep. You’ll feel more energized and prepared to take care of pressure.

Below are some other questions to think about as you organize your smoke free life.
Does smoking:

Supply ways to meet people or hang out with a group?
Distract you when you’re feeling lonely?
Help you control your weight?
Boost your self-confidence?
Give you something to do with your hands or alternative physical habits?
Serve as a companion to coffee or booze or look like the thing to do after a meal?
Give you something to do while you’re driving?

Below are some great alternatives to deal with quitting smoking:

Rethink your social breaks. Should you smoke with friends to be social or with coworkers in your lunch break? It is essential to let them know that you’re attempting to stop and encourage them to join you. In case it becomes too difficult to spend time in these areas where you typically smoke, think about altering your schedule or taking your breaks with nonsmokers.

Some Fruits Help Reduce High Blood Pressure

Strawberries

Strawberries are a great ally in treating and preventing hypertension. At least, 8 strawberries contain 240 mg of potassium and 1.44 mg of sodium, a great proportion to sustain a blood pressure.

Papaya

A papaya comprises 781 mg of potassium, a mineral, and electrolyte that helps to regulate hypertension. In fact, the American Heart Association suggests we get 4,700 mg of potassium a day to control our blood pressure. Consume fresh papaya on an empty stomach for about one month, will lower the risk of having cardiovascular diseases, and is an efficient remedy for hypertension.

Blueberries

Blueberries are relatively low in sugar while being high in fibre and heart-healthy antioxidants. Previous studies have revealed that ladies who consumed more than three servings per week of blueberries (and strawberries) had a 32 percent lower chance of having a heart attack. The benefit was due to flavonoids in the berries recognised as anthocyanin, which are antioxidants that give these fruits their characteristic red and purple hues.

Spinach

Fresh and leafy spinach, is low in calories, high in fibre, and packed with heart-healthy nutrients like potassium, folate, and magnesium – essential components for reducing and controlling blood levels. Want an easy way of consuming more of this excellent green? Try mixing fresh spinach leaves into salads or adding them to sandwiches.